As Bhutan has increasingly opened to the outside world and the national modernization process has gained momentum, from the late 1980s, Bhutan has taken important steps to maintain its biodiversity and lay the foundation for its future conservation. A very important step was the declaration by His Majesty the Fourth King of Bhutan to keep at least 60% of the country forested at all times. In 1993, the original wildlife protection zones on Bhutan’s northern and southern borders were expanded and upgraded to a system of full protection areas, which today covers 26% of the country and the complete range of natural habitats found in Bhutan. The protected areas system has a central place in the conservation of the avifauna of Bhutan, within important parts of the ranges of various globally threatened or near-threatened species lying within these areas. Major protected areas are discussed below, including examples of wildlife species found in those areas.

At Off to Bhutan, we carefully research emerging opportunities for our guests, such as when new areas of the country are opened to foreign tourists by the Royal Bhutan Government.  We also explore the various nature preserves, parks, and other rural areas to provide a unique insider’s perspective to the best locations for viewing Bhutan’s endemic flora and fauna.  We look forward to sharing what we have found with you.

Click here to start your Bhutan adventure, and then leave the rest to us.